Clathrus archeri-Octopus Stinkhorn

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I have no idea how this weird octopus-like mushrooms came from Tasmania and Australia just to the forest behind my house.They look like aliens in fall forest and I believe any alien ewer smelled that bad as these mushrooms do.But still, this is nature and according to Wikipedia even edible one:

The Octopus Stinkhorn is edible, but its taste is extremely foul. The eggs of this fungus taste and smell like radish and are the only edible stage. It should only be eaten in a wilderness survival circumstance when no other food is available. In other cases, it is considered inedible.

Octopus Stinkhorn
Octopus Stinkhorn (Clathrus archeri) with suberumpent eggs
Conservation status
uncommon
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Phallales
Family: Phallaceae
Genus: Clathrus
Species: C. archeri
Binomial name
Clathrus archeri
(Berk.Dring 1980

from:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clathrus_archeri

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28 thoughts on “Clathrus archeri-Octopus Stinkhorn

  1. I’ve never seen that one, and I’m not sure I’d want to eat a stinky plant. My mother had a carrion flower in her shadehouse (Stapelia Lepida – pic at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stapelia_lepida.jpg), and while the flower was stunning, in tones of strong mustard and deep, deep purple, the smell of rotting meat was overpowering. Made it very popular with flies.

    One wonders what advantage the octopus stinkhorn gains by being so whiffy…

    • Octopus stinkhorn smell of putrid flesh attracts flies…and ONLY flies!
      I saw carrion flower in Florence, but it was not flowering, so I couldn’t smell it which perhaps was not bad ;)

  2. About a month ago I found one of these beautiful, strange flowers growing in my lawn, it was striking red with black ‘arms’. Then three weeks ago I found a large section of my garden overtaken with them. I cannot detect any odour coming from them, but I haven’t been keen to get too close.

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