Cetonia aurata, C.G.Jung and synchronicity

Today I came along the same bush I wrote about in my previous post ”Visitors”, describing a merry buzzing group of diverse insects. A surprise! This time the  entire bush was conquered by rose chafers solely,  each of them resembling a small green armored vehicle cruising  over white flowers.  Due to special circumstances C.G. Jung would call this synchronicity, a meaningful coincidence a subject finds between causally unrelated events. It made me think, anyway……………..

 

In his book Synchronicity (1952), Jung tells the following story as an example of a synchronistic event:

A young woman I was treating had, at a critical moment, a dream in which she was given a golden scarab. While she was telling me this dream, I sat with my back to the closed window. Suddenly I heard a noise behind me, like a gentle tapping. I turned round and saw a flying insect knocking against the window-pane from the outside. I opened the window and caught the creature in the air as it flew in. It was the nearest analogy to a golden scarab one finds in our latitudes, a scarabaeid beetle, the common rose-chafer (Cetonia aurata), which, contrary to its usual habits had evidently felt the urge to get into a dark room at this particular moment. I must admit that nothing like it ever happened to me before or since.[14] from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronicity

 

 

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Masquerade and Plants

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There were many beautiful illustrations in the old zoological textbook I wrote about in my last post. Today I’ve picked some illustrious examples of what is known as masquerade or mimesis. Basically, prey animals during evolution developed mechanisms, to camouflage and have higher surveillance rates. Mimetic animals look like something else, not interesting to the predator, like bark, twig, leaf or even lichen. You have the examples on the pictures above, they are actuary  full of  mother nature’s wit. But could it be presumed, that mimesis is a form of  aggressive influential behaviour? Meaning ,that flora in general, is in a way pushing other species to try to survive by being more flora like. Which in turn ends in better surveillance rates of real flora, as the, so to say, fake mimetic subjects de facto are ”incompetent plants”? Would like to hear your opinion about this science-fiction idea!

Sociable weaver

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illustrations from: Erjavec F.:Ptice;  Celovec 1893

I love old books , It amuses me to read archaic Slovene language, old illustrations are magical.  I’ve picked these illustrations from an old Slovene book about nature, where , among others, author stands fascinated about the artistry of little birds from Africa, able to make spectacular ”condominium” nests . There can live up to 3 hundred families in neighbour nest cells. First picture above shows the early phases of such a nest and the second picture shows it finished ( woven with grasses and tiny sticks). It is the biggest structure birds can build. A sort of bird’s megapolis.

It is interesting that these birds are not endangered today, for they are able to find so many artificial building materials around human settlements, that they have excellent conditions for their nests and therefore for many new families. And these are two good stories that made me write today’s post: I am happy to find an old Slovene book about nature in excellent condition, with great illustrations , and I am happy to learn that not only book, but also these birds made it into modern times……

 

Erinaceus concolor or somebody wandering alone in the night

As I met this little guy wandering trough the garden I had to publish his photo. Not only for he is so cute, even not for he does such a good job in the garden but for I was surprised to read all the scientific articles dealing with this little creature.Among the more interesting ones is the one about glacial eras and hedgehogs migration.Or the one about hedgehogs menu in urban area.Or about the shape of its cranium. I really wonder what influences the choice of scientific interest upon a certain subject-for.example why nobody investigated for.example hedgehogs in the art ? Is it.possible.that our archetypal picture of certain subject prejudices the interest we would develop about it? For this could mean that the investigations in science could be under different archetypes oriented towards different topics???
Anyway, this may be too much for a young hedgehog wandering trough my botanical garden…….
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