Cyclamen

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My sister has a nice habit of buying cyclamen for her kids each winter .As  I bought one myself last week the spring seems nearer; it will be easier to wait for the first cyclamen in the woods. A little poem goes like:C is for cyclamen-do not try to hide from us for your smell is telling where you are………

And indeed, the shy cyclamen smells so strong, you cannot miss it, as kids we wandered the woods to find the very first ones…..

Searching for more details for this post I found lake Bled district ,Slovenia,  has special dark variant of Cyclamen purpurascens: can’t wait to find it -I promise a post  ; )

Till then something from:

http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Cyclamen_purpurascens

Classification System: APG III (down to family level):

Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiosperms
Cladus: Eudicots
Cladus: Core eudicots
Cladus: Asterids
Cladus: Unassigned Asterids
Ordo: Ericales
Familia: Primulaceae
Tribus: Cyclamineae
Genus: Cyclamen
Species: Cyclamen purpurascens

Sunflowers-Vincent van Gogh

Buy sunflower print

 

Sunflowers, c.1888

Vincent Van Goghfrom:http://www.vangoghgallery.com/printsandposters/van-gogh-top-20.html

Opening the new art page in My Botanical Garden may I start with Vincent and his  Sunflowers, as they are so well known, becoming a symbol of our common consciousness.Interpreted so many times, from worst kitsch up to classy reinterpretations, the sunflowers always bear that echo from the hot summer with them.Are sunflowers as plants already a symbol of forgotten summers or is art reinterpreting their symbolism to tie them with our memories of endless summers?In this case I may ask, with all the seriousness, was there first Vincent ore were sunflowers?

 

TATAR MAPLE-ACER TATARICUM

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As I walked trough my botanical garden last time in cold January I found Acer tataricum-I simply liked its name,the picture of its branches against the blue, blue sky and the tiny new little branches emerging into new spring to come………….enough for me to list you some more facts:

Acer tataricum (Tatar Maple or Tatarian Maple) is a species of maple native to central and southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia, from Austria east to southwestern Russia and theCaucasus, and south to Turkey. The species is named after the Tatar peoples of southern Russia; the tree’s name is similarly commonly also spelled “Tartar” in English.[1][2]

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Sapindaceae
Genus: Acer
Species: A. tataricum
Binomial name
Acer tataricum
L.from:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acer_tataricum

Tatarian maple is often confused with Amur maple. Tatarian Maple grows slightly larger and is naturally more tree-like in growth habit.

  Morphology:
This is a broadleaf deciduous tree that can grow to 20’ in height and 25’ in width. It often forms a multi-stem structure. At maturity the tree shape is described as rounded to wide spreading. Leaves are set in an opposite arrangement and are simple. They are typically un-lobed, though young trees do have 2-5 lobes. The leaf margin is double serrated. During hot summer the leaves are green, while in the fall they turn shades of yellow to reddish brown. The fall color of Tatarian Maple is considered better than Amur Maple.

Flowering starts in April. The flower clusters are known as panicles, and are greenish white in color. Flowers give rise to double-wing samaras which have a pleasing red color. During the winter the samaras dry down and hang from the branches.

  Adaptation:
This tree does best in sun to partial shade. It is widely adapted to most sites, as long as the soil is well drained.

from:http://pnwplants.wsu.edu/PlantDisplay.aspx?PlantID=615

AN OLD-FASHIONED LITTLE TREE

Old Tatarian maples can be seen in Helsinki and St. Petersburg, but there are not many further west. The Tatarian maple is a low-growing small tree with a rounded crown and often a twisted trunk, with lovely autumn colours. Nowadays it is not planted at all, and in nurseries it has been replaced by a close relative, the bushy Amur maple. It has lobed leaves, unlike the unlobed leaves of the Tatarian maple. Characteristic old Tatarian maples grow in many of the old parks around the central part of the city, such as Katajanokanpuisto, Alli Trygg Park and on Tähtitorninvuori.

from:http://www.kasvitkaupunginvaatteet.fi/plants-tatarian-maple/

Vintage rose soap

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Searching for Christmas gift with a story I found this luxury vintage rose soap forgotten somewhere on the attic at time of sweet sixties.Thrilled with this found I’ve opened it:s decorative package and sweet smell of a red rose brought memories.Winter ,dropping first snow to gently cower the roses in the garden, calling Christmas time to come,stayed at the other side of my windows.Slowly unwrapping deep red fabric I’we felt like a child getting the most wished gift.The smell of a summer filled with red roses scent embraced me wondering who would be the one to get this.precious gift.Shall I blame myself for such a strong wish to keep this old luxury piece of forgotten summers? I wrapped the soap back in it’s time box, put it on a high shelf, pretending no one would care for a piece of old junk………..

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Brussels botanical.garden

Brussels has got two botanical gardens,a new one in the outskirts of the town and the old one,remaining the silent witness of the times passed far ago. Locked in the city center, with metal statues in green defending the paths between trees, planted by a plan of forgotten past. Only broad shallow escalier descending from historical glass house with orangery ties that forgotten times with buzz in glass cubes surrounding the park and letting their accountants drop out for a lunch break in the shadows of forgotten park .The glasshouse has become a french cultural centre in between ,offering many concerts and music festivals and some photographic exhibits. 

 

Photo from Brussels botanical garden

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I just like this photo of me taking photo of botanical garden, shadows are like laces as a graphic contrast to colourfull picture of reality behind the scene. This duality has sense depiciting botanical garden which is no.more real.botanical garden, but where the old trees remain as a shadow of old times like this picture remains my souvenir from Brussels, asking me what is real and what just a picture……..

St Nicholas and Krampus from Salzburg

Tonight St Nicholas is bringing gifts to kids.The brave ones will get their plates filled with sweets and little gifts, the naughty ones are getting only a piece of charcoal, but all of them will get at least one Krampus, just for instance …….

I found this Krampus troop in Salzburg (I swear they are not from my plate 😉 ), and as they are so “botanical” they deserve to be published, don’t you think so?

Florilegium Societies

Florilegium Societies

  • The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew opened a new gallery in 2008 to display works of botanical illustration alongside pieces from the collection of Dr Shirley Sherwood. The Shirley Sherwood Gallery was the first public gallery in the world dedicated to showing botanical art. Kew’s archives contain 200,000 works of botanical art, including pieces by 18th and 19th century masters, along with works by contemporary artists.
  • The Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney formed a Florilegium Society to create a collection of paintings of the significant plants growing in the estates of the Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust.[3]
  • The Friends of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne created in 2001 a Florilegium of significant plants growing in the Gardens. This 21st century florilegium is held digitally and photographically, the original works are not kept. [4]
  • The Sheffield Botanical Gardens established a Florilegium Society which aims to produce an archive of botanical illustrations of the plants of Sheffield Botanical Gardens.[5]
  • from:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florilegium

The Roseberry Strawberry; Joseph Sabine, p. 381, 23.1 x 18.3 cm, “Account and Description (with a figure) of a new Strawberry called the Raspberry, or Rose Strawberry”; September 2, 1817

from:http://library.rit.edu/cary/roseberry-strawberry-0

Pinetum

Pinetum

Pronunciation:/pʌɪˈniːtəm/
noun (plural pineta /-tə/)

Christmas time is here , Christmas trees everywhere, so I decided to open pinetum in My botanical garden! Let start with Christmas trees-listed below are the most common (cited from:http://www.christmastree.org/types.cfm ):

  1. Arizona Cypress-Cupressus arizonica Greene
  2. Colorado blue spruce-Picea pungens Engelm.
  3. Concolor fir-Abies concolor
  4. Eastern Redcedar-Juniperus virginiana L.
  5. Fraser Fir-Abies Frasieri
  6. Leyland cypress-x Cupressocyparis leylandii
  7. Virginia Pine-Pinus Virginiana
  8. Balsam Fir-Abies balsamea (L.) Miller
  9. Canaan Fir-Abies balsamea var. phanerolepis
  10. Douglas Fir-Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco
  11. Eastern White Pine-Pinus Strobus L.
  12. Grand Fir-Abies grandis
  13. Noble Fir-Abies procera
  14. Scotch Pine-Pinus sylvestris L.
  15. White spruce-Picea glauca

The biggest and most beautiful pinetum is Bedgebury National Pinetum (http://www.bedgeburypinetum.org.uk/index.php ) with the most complete collection of conifers in the world.