New nature reserve in northern Colombia

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:

This video is called Colombia, birds and wildlife.

From Wildlife Extra:

New nature reserve created in northern Colombia

ProAves, the Rainforest Trust and Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC) have announced the creation of the Chamicero de Perijá Nature Reserve, the first protected area in northern Colombia’s Serranía de Perijá mountain range.

ProAves has acquired 11 adjacent properties that form the 1,850-acre reserve, which protects a pristine cloud forest environment that includes critical habitat for threatened wildlife.

This reserve’s establishment is extremely timely, as 98 per cent of the Serranía de Perijá’s rainforests have already been destroyed due to colonisation and agricultural expansion.

“Without this reserve, the chances are high that within a few years nothing would be left of the spectacular forests that once covered Colombia’s Serranía de Perijá,” said Dr Paul Salaman, CEO of the Rainforest Trust.

There has been a history of difficulties in conducting research in…

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Singapore is not only about orchids

Originally posted on Darwin on the rocks and around the world :

In my last post, I was showing you how diverse the national orchid garden can be, but you can also find other flowers in this incredible botanical gardens. I have a soft spot for the gingers (as well as for the orchids obviously… and we could say I have a soft spot for every flower if I want to be honest with you).

We saw nice specimens over there, but like I said previously, it was raining so much that it was really tricky to be able to take good pictures with only one hand.. as the second one was holding an umbrella :-)

I’m not able to give you the names of this beautiful flowers… If someone knows, feel free to share ! :-)

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The English and Garden Contemplation

Originally posted on Old School Garden:

Contemplation/ garden of Gethsemane- by Jenny Meehan
Contemplation/ Garden of Gethsemane by Jenny Meehan

‘..Gardening has always been regarded as a peculiarly English activity: indeed, it has assumed a key role in English identity. There are two main reasons for this..first…the weather….But there are also cultural reasons why gardening became the favoured activity of the English….English Gardens were seen as having curative powers for the English malady of melancholy….English people, unlike their continental counterparts, for whom it was a place for parade and social intercourse, went into the garden for a very different purpose- contemplation. I believe it was the Reformation which gave Englishmen their green fingers. In Catholic countries meditation took place in churches, monasteries and nunneries. In England the setting for contemplation became the garden….’

Sir Roy Strong: ‘Visions of England’ (Random House, 2011)

Old School Gardener

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Plant collecting in Kakadu

Originally posted on Parks Australia:

Tom North, Australian National Botanic Gardens seed bank manager, pressing plant specimens with Kakadu ranger Jenny Hunter

Tom North, Australian National Botanic Gardens seed bank manager, pressing plant specimens with Kakadu ranger Jenny Hunter

This year I headed north to collect plant material from Kakadu National Park – and to share skills with traditional owners, park rangers and local nursery operators on how to collect, handle and store seed.

Covering an area half the size of Switzerland, Kakadu is a place of amazing ecological and biological diversity. It contains more than 2,000 different types of plant species with still more to be described.

The landscapes are home to a range of rare and endemic plants. On this trip, we wanted to collect some of the park’s threatened plant species. We were also looking to collect key species from the Stone Country and species with little biological knowledge attached to them.

We used helicopters, quad bikes and four-wheel drives to get to some pretty inaccessible areas within the park…

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Summertime botanical gardens

Summertime is here, time for holidays, travel, time for new discoveries, learning, time to meet old friends or make new, time for forgotten hobbies and time for open air concerts, Venetian biennale and ice cream cassata, time for watermelons and summer flowers. And it is perfect time to visit a Botanical Garden in the neighborhood or far away. For this summer I decided to reblog some posts I consider worth visiting, welcome on board-We are travelling botanical gardens, summertime is here!!!!!

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Photos taken in Ljubljana Botanical Gardens

An island of flowers – Part 4: Madeira Botanical garden

Originally posted on Naturanaute:

Reached by a short drive from the centre of Funchal, the Jardim Botanico, located 300m above sea level is a relatively recent botanic garden (opened in 1960), but full of surprises. We start our visit by the spectacular Succulents zone, with the orange flower heads of Aloe striata and red ones of Aloe plicatilis :

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As everywhere in Madeira, there are fantastic views of the sea, this time through the tall stems of true cacti (Cactaceae – Cereus peruvianus for example) and false cacti (such as Euphorbia ingens):

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The succulent garden features numerous South-African groundcovers such as the  daisy-like Glottiphyllum depressum or the prostrate and vicious-looking Euphorbia grandicornis.

Glottiphyllum fragransEuphorbia grandicornis

Going down from the succulent garden, we find a palheira (traditional triangular-shaped Madeiran cottage), surrounded by frangipani trees:

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The next garden is a assemblage of elaborate topiary shapes,  reminding the visitor of famous Italian gardens. Note also the primitive conifer Araucaria…

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Holy Chihuly!

Originally posted on Jessica Lamirand:

Phoenix

Phoenix

Denver

Denver

This spring, I happened to travel to Phoenix and one of the places that I most wanted to see was the Desert Botanical Gardens. By chance when I visited the garden, an exhibition of Dale Chihuly’s glass sculptures was in its final days. I loved seeing his vibrant glass masterpieces, sometimes nestled in and hiding among the Sonoran landscape in full springtime bloom—letting the plants be the stars—and sometimes taking charge of the setting.

I’ve always liked Chihuly but until recently had only seen his art in an indoor setting. Experiencing it at the Desert Botanical Gardens, I came to the realization now that Chihuly’s work belongs in the outdoors. So imagine my surprise when I learned that Denver Botanic Gardens, where I am a member, would feature Chihuly’s artwork this year from June to November.

Phoenix

Phoenix

Denver

Denver

Having now seen the exhibit in Denver twice, I cannot…

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Garden Portrait: Logan Botanic Garden

Originally posted on Earth laughs in flowers...:

Logan Botanic Garden is situated at the south-western tip of Scotland in an almost island-like setting, where the warming influence of the Gulf Stream allows thousands of different species from the warm temperate regions of the world to flourish. There are two contrasting areas in the garden: The Walled Garden and The Woodland Garden. As you walk into the gardens from the Visitor Reception area, you have little idea of what awaits you. On the left pathways lead to the woodland, which is no ordinary woodland as it contains Chilean specimens, Australasian collections and a Tasmanian Creek and viewing platform. Not really what you’d expect this far north of the UK.  Walking through the entrance into the Walled Garden lies a complete surprise. Sheltered by 15 foot high walls are rolling lawns, groves of tree ferns and palms, water features and exotic plants. DSCF9015

DSCF9060 It’s all very strange and not remotely…

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